The 2012 flick may have gone unnoticed for many reasons, but the song sure as hell didn’t. Take, for instance, the 2012 smash hit “Gangnam Style” by Psy. Whether it's the Lakers, the Dodgers or the Kings, you're hearing that damn song. According to Marley's ex lover, the song actually details his desire for her not to take birth control pills, something he allegedly believed to be sacrilegious. Every single time. There have been popular songs with creepy or spooky lyrics since the beginning of rock music. That’s the thing with open-ended songs, they leave room for imagination, often leading towards a dirty meaning. Take his 1973 song "I Shot the Sheriff," for example. The song's title is a play on Everclear, which Bushwick Bill had been drinking at the time, and the message of the song's last line: "It's fucked up I had to lose an eye to see shit clearly." Over the years, songwriters, wanting to prove the mastery of their art, have tried to add a whole new meaning to their songs by including hidden messages within the lyrics. Songs about depression can be the best place to turn when the black dog comes around. However, a lot of the songs you so fondly belt at karaoke actually have a much darker meaning. Meaning it's been playing in LA pretty much nonstop for the past 30 years or so. Now, nursery rhymes often have surprisingly violent lyrics, but if "Rock-a-bye Baby" is to be believed, not only is somebody climbing up trees and sticking their babies on the highest branches, but they're also watching as the cradle drops, and then writing songs about it. On January 6, 1975, British progressive rock band Pink Floyd were riding a wave of success on Dark Side of the Moon, a sophisticated concept album about the things in life that break people’s spirits.They returned to Abbey Road studios to begin work on their follow-up, Wish You Were Here.It was a concept album that touched on such themes as absence, the corruption within the music … The song's meaning was laid out in the 2011 film Bob Marley: The Making of a Legend, according to the Miami New Times. Yes, that fictional grande dame of kiddie poems has got a bit of a dark streak, as evidenced by the unexpectedly sinister theories surrounding the origins of … Many songs from the '90s are, like the decade itself, fun, catchy and well-remembered. The meaning of “Every Breath You Take” has been debated and misunderstood for decades. At face value, "Total Eclipse of the Heart" is a love song – but songwriter Jim Steinman has admitted it was a vampire love song, originally titled "Vampires in Love". Or if you've ever attended a major sporting event in the city, you've heard the song whenever the home team scored a goal or won a game. From start to end, this song is nothing but vulgar and has managed to save composers and lyricists from many lawsuits with one word - photo. But it’s hard to think of the song as anything other than …